Diets for Multiple Sclerosis

Anti-Inflammatory Diet:

Anti-Inflammatory Diet:

Anti-Inflammatory Diet:

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 Anti-Inflammatory Diet:  

There are many types of Multiple Sclerosis diets in this category with one thing in common.  They all suggests that certain foods cause inflammation and inflammation is prevalent in MS, pain, and discomfort.  The good thing about these diets for multiple sclerosis is that it is the easiest to follow for foodies.  I have research a lot of them and I like Dr. Weil's the best.  I mean who can't follow a diet with pasta, cheese, dark chocolate, and red wine? Here is the link:  Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid

Mediterranean Diet

Anti-Inflammatory Diet:

Anti-Inflammatory Diet:

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 Mediterranean Diets for Multiple Sclerosis 

Researchers are evaluating how inflammatory characteristics of Multiple Slerosis may be relieved with a Mediterranean diet that includes fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and avocados, and eliminates meat, dairy, and processed foods. Feb 26, 2018 

The Swank Diet

Anti-Inflammatory Diet:

The Swank Diet

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 The Swank Diet 

 The Swank diet intends to ease the symptoms of MS through nutritional management. ... A main feature of the Swank diet is that it limits fat, especially saturated fat. People who follow the diet are encouraged to consume lean fish, non-fat dairy products, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. 

Wahls Protocol

Overcoming MS Diet

The Swank Diet

Wahls Protocol Book

 Wahls Protocol 

 The Wahls Protocol eliminates starches and includes certain meats,   Ultimately, this new way of eating still based on Paleo principles, but now organized to maximize these nutrients that were important to the brain. In fact, I now track 36 different vitamins, minerals, essential fats, and antioxidants to make sure the diet has been specifically designed to provide those things, and that is what I now call the Wahls Diets for multiple sclerosis. We’re basically adding more leafy green vegetables; sulfur-rich vegetables like cabbage, mushroom, onion family; deeply pigmented foods like carrots, beets, berries; grass fed meats; wild fish; and seaweed. As people progress in the diet, we help them transition from their current way of eating to a more nutrient-dense, more low-glycemic way of eating that is better for one’s brain health.  *Multiple Sclerosis Foundation

McDougall Diet

Overcoming MS Diet

Overcoming MS Diet

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 McDougall Diet 

 The McDougall diet is a low-fat, vegetarian diet that some with MS believe improves their mood improves and increases their energy.  

Overcoming MS Diet

Overcoming MS Diet

Overcoming MS Diet

Overcoming MS Diet

 

The Overcoming MS (OMS)diet was developed by Dr George Jelinek in 1999 following his own diagnosis with MS. It combines a number of different elements, including diet, exercise, meditation, vitamin D and medication.


The Paleo diet

Best Bet, by Ashton Embry

Gluten-Free Diet for MS

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 The Paleo diet for multiple sclerosis provides guidelines for the kinds of foods that should be eaten and the balance in sources of caloric intake. The first step is to eat natural foods while avoiding highly processed food, especially high glycemic load foods (carbohydrate foods that significantly raise blood sugar). The Paleo diets for multiple sclerosis also emphasizes the intake of game (nondomesticated) meats and plant based foods besides cereals (fruits, roots, legumes and nuts) 

Gluten-Free Diet for MS

Best Bet, by Ashton Embry

Gluten-Free Diet for MS

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 The gluten-free diet is safe, and can be healthy for everyone. It may also hold the key to better health, alleviating symptoms such as: 

  • Fatigue 
  • Headaches (including migraines) 
  • Joint/muscle pain (often misdiagnosed as fibromyalgia) 
  • Infertility 
  • Mood disorders (depression, bipolar, “fuzzy head,” schizophrenia) 
  • Gastrointestinal distress (diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating, reflux) 
  • Insomnia 
  • Ataxia (neurological) 
  • Seizures 
  • Respiratory distress (including asthma) 
  • Lactose intolerance 
  •  Skin disorders (often misdiagnosed as eczema) 
  • Autoimmune diseases (hashimoto’s, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis) 
  •  Weight gain or weight loss 

Best Bet, by Ashton Embry

Best Bet, by Ashton Embry

Best Bet, by Ashton Embry

Best Bet diet vegetables

 ​​This Diet is based on healing a leaky gut to slow down and ideally prevent intact food proteins from entering circulation and​ stop eating foods which contain proteins which can potentially  mimic self-proteins in the CNS. 

Ketogenic Diet for MS

Mayo Clinic Diet Suggestions

Best Bet, by Ashton Embry

KETO Diet

 ​The ketogenic diet (keto) for multiple sclerosis is a low-carb, high-fat diet. It lowers blood sugar and insulin levels, and shifts the body’s metabolism away from carbs and towards fat and ketones.  It is thought that a ketogenic dietmayprovide many health benefits, especially with metabolic, neurological or insulin-related diseases. 

The Plant Paradox

Mayo Clinic Diet Suggestions

Mayo Clinic Diet Suggestions

Plant paradox book

 Dr. Steven Gundry reveals that gluten is just one variety of a common, and highly toxic, plant-based protein called lectin. Lectins are found not only in grains like wheat but also in the “gluten-free” foods most of us commonly regard as healthy, including many fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, and conventional dairy products. These proteins, which are found in the seeds, grains, skins, rinds, and leaves of plants, are designed by nature to protect them from predators (including humans). Once ingested, they incite a kind of chemical warfare in our bodies, causing inflammatory reactions that can lead to weight gain and serious health conditions. 

Mayo Clinic Diet Suggestions

Mayo Clinic Diet Suggestions

Mayo Clinic Diet Suggestions

Mayo Clinic

 

Overall, people with Multiple Sclerosis need a balanced, low-fat and high-fiber diet. Unprocessed or naturally processed foods are preferred to processed foods. This is similar to the Mediterranean diet, and the same healthy diet that's recommended for the general population. Also consider limiting alcohol as much as possible.

Some research suggests that a diet low in saturated fats and supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids may benefit people with MS. But these results haven't been confirmed by large-scale studies. However, it's recommended that people with MS limit animal-based fats. Instead, opt for fish and nut-based fat sources such as olive oil, avocado oil and almond butter, which are rich in omega-3s. This is one of the best diets for multiple sclerosis.

Disclaimer

  

* Disclaimer: The information you find here in MS Frontiers Multiple Sclerosis Support is based on what has worked for some of us with MS. No one solution or medication works for everyone, so the suggestions and information you find on this site should not take the place of your doctor.